Webinar Archives

This webinar was presented by by Carlie Herring of NOAA.

Dive into the world of microplastics with the NOAA Marine Debris Program! Learn about what microplastics are, the different types, the impacts associated with microplastic marine debris, and future research needs.

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

The Washed Ashore Project uses community art created from marine debris with the help of thousands of volunteers to raise awareness about plastic pollution in order to spark changes in the consumer habits that have generated this global issue. Over the past two years, with NOAA support, Washed Ashore has worked to create a curriculum based on the goals of our project. The lessons bring together art and science to help students understand the plastic pollution issue and communicate about it using the language of the arts. Workshops to introduce the curriculum and receive feedback were held at Washed Ashore exhibit venues around the country and the curriculum was piloted in Bandon, Oregon, where Washed Ashore is based.

In this webinar, Patrick Chandler, the Washed Ashore curriculum author and project manager, discussed his experience using art to communicate, conducting teachers’ workshops, curriculum development, and shared lessons learned. For more information on the Washed Ashore curriculum, please visit http://washedashore.org/iamdc/.

This webinar was presented by Elissa Loughman (Patagonia), Bess Ruff (UCSB Bren School) and, Angela Howe (Surfrider Foundation).

Scientists are still beginning to understand the effects of plastic pollution on marine life who suffer injury and death through entanglement and ingestion of the synthetic material. Now we’ve discovered that there is a new microscopic form of plastic pollution entering our waterways from the washing of clothing that includes nylon, acrylic, and PET materials. The agitation and centrifuging occurring during the wash cycle releases micro- and nano plastic fibers into the wastewater stream that end up in sewers, rivers, and the ocean. This webinar will explore the cutting-edge science investigating microfibers from UCSB’s Bren School of Environmental Science and Management informing us about the nature and threat of microfibers. In addition, an industry perspective on this new development will be presented addressing possible responses and solutions to the problem.

This webinar will be useful to government stormwater and solid waste management practioners, restaurant owners, and aquatic resource managers.

Webinar cosponsored by the West Coast Marine Debris Alliance, the EBM Tools Network (coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org), and MarineDebris.Info.

Learn about how Clean Water Fund developed Rethink Disposable in partnership with San Francisco Bay Area municipalities to engage local businesses and the public in implementing upstream solutions to reduce the amount of disposable take-out food packaging ending up in creeks and San Francisco Bay. In addition to preventing marine debris, the benefits of reducing and eliminating disposables include: conserving resources, reducing waste, preventing pollution, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions throughout the lifecycle of a single-use disposable product from extraction to disposal. Minimizing single-use disposable packaging can provide environmental and economic benefits to local governments and significant cost savings to businesses. Rethink Disposable is helping lead a cultural shift towards making “reusable” the new norm.

This webinar was presented by Jenna Jambeck of the University of Georgia. Considerable progress has been made in determining the amount and location of plastic debris in our seas, but how much plastic actually enters them in the first place is more uncertain. Dr. Jambeck led a research team that combined available data on waste management infrastructure with a model that uses population density and economic status to estimate the amount of land-based plastic waste entering the ocean. The findings: as much as 12.7 million metric tons of plastic is entering the global ocean annually, and unless waste management practices are improved, the flux of plastics to the oceans could increase by an order of magnitude within the next decade. In this one-hour webinar, Dr. Jambeck will cover this groundbreaking study and answer audience questions on her methods and findings, including implications for reducing marine debris. The study and a podcast about the study are available at www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6223/768.abstract. This webinar was co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network and MarineDebris.Info.

Featuring John Kellett (Clearwater Mills) and Adam Lindquist (Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore).

This one-hour webinar answered your questions about how Baltimore’s Inner Harbor Water Wheel works as a debris collection mechanism and whether a similar system might be applicable to watershed cleanup programs elsewhere.

In this interactive panel discussion, three experts on ocean plastics discussed the utility and feasibility of marine debris cleanup, and will take audience questions.

This webinar explored how two companies' innovations in plastic manufacturing could help address the problem of persistent ocean plastics in different ways.

This webinar explored how NOAA, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Digital Ocean Collaborative on Marine Debris, and other partners are planning for the potential arrival of Japanese tsunami marine debris in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in early 2012.