Literature Library

Currently indexing 42 titles

Transboundary movement of marine litter in an estuarine gradient: Evaluating sources and sinks using hydrodynamic modelling and ground truthing estimates

Krelling APaul, Souza MMachado, Williams AThomas, Turra A. Transboundary movement of marine litter in an estuarine gradient: Evaluating sources and sinks using hydrodynamic modelling and ground truthing estimates. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17302527
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine debris' transboundary nature and new strategies to identify sources and sinks in coastal areas were investigated along the Paranaguá estuarine gradient (southern Brazil), through integration of hydrodynamic modelling, ground truthing estimates and regressive vector analysis. The simulated release of virtual particles in different parts of the inner estuary suggests a residence time shorter than 5 days before being exported through the estuary mouth (intermediate compartment) to the open ocean. Stranded litter supported this pathway, with beaches in the internal compartment presenting proportionally more items from domestic sources, while fragmented items with unknown sources were proportionally more abundant in the oceanic beaches. Regressive vector analysis reinforced the inner estuarine origin of the stranded litter in both estuarine and oceanic beaches. These results support the applicability of simple hydrodynamic models to address marine debris' transboundary issues in the land-sea transition zone, thus supporting an ecosystem transboundary (and not territorial) management approach.

Anthropogenic debris in the nests of kelp gulls in South Africa

Witteveen M, Brown M, Ryan PG. Anthropogenic debris in the nests of kelp gulls in South Africa. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 ;114(2):699 - 704. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16308694
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Anthropogenic debris results in detrimental interactions with many marine species. Several seabirds include debris items in their nests, which can lead to entanglement of chicks and adults, resulting in injury or death. Anthropogenic debris was found in 4–67% of kelp gull Larus dominicanus nests in seven colonies in the Western Cape, South Africa. Nests contained two types of litter: items included in the nest structure during construction (mainly ropes and straps), and regurgitated items (mainly bags and food wrappers) that probably accumulate primarily during the chick-rearing period. Debris used in nest construction was more likely to injure gulls, and was found mainly at coastal sites where there was little natural vegetation for construction. Distance to the nearest urban waste landfill significantly affected the occurrence of debris items in nests, especially dietary-derived items. The amount of debris in kelp gull nests highlights the need for improved debris management in South Africa.

Harm caused by Marine Litter

Werner S, Budziak A, van Franeker J, Galgani F, Hanke G, Maes T, Matiddi M, Nilsson P, Oosterbaan L, Priestland E, et al. Harm caused by Marine Litter. Ispra, Italy: Joint Research Centre; 2016. Available from: https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/publication/harm-caused-marine-litter
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

Marine litter is a global concern with a range of problems associated to it, as recognised by the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Marine litter can impact organisms at different levels of biological organization and habitats in a number of ways namely: through entanglement in, or ingestion of, litter items by individuals, resulting in death and/or severe suffering; through chemical and microbial transfer; as a vector for transport of biota and by altering or modifying assemblages of species. Marine litter is a threat not only to marine species and ecosystems but also carries a risk to human health and has significant implications to human welfare, impacting negatively vital economic sectors such as tourism, fisheries, aquaculture or energy supply and bringing economic losses to individuals, enterprises and communities. This technical report aims to provide clear insight about the major negative impacts from marine litter by describing the mechanisms of harm. Further it provides reflexions about the evidence for harm from marine litter to biota comprising the underlying aspect of animal welfare while also considering the socioeconomic effects, including the influence of marine litter on ecosystem services. General conclusions highlight that understanding the risks and uncertainties with regard to the harm caused by marine litter is closely associated with the precautionary principle. The collected evidence in this report can be regarded as a supporting step to define harm and to provide an evidence base for the various actions needed to be implemented by decision-makers. This improved knowledge about the scale of the harmful effects of marine litter will further support EU Member States (MSs) and Regional Seas Conventions (RSCs) to implement their programme of measures, regional action plans and assessments.

Plastic debris and microplastics along the beaches of the Strait of Hormuz, Persian Gulf

Naji A, Esmaili Z, Khan FR. Plastic debris and microplastics along the beaches of the Strait of Hormuz, Persian Gulf. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 ;114(2):1057 - 1062. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16309523
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Currently little is known about the prevalence of plastics and microplastics (MPs) in the Persian Gulf. Five sampling stations were selected along the Strait of Hormuz (Iran) that exhibited different levels of industrialization and urbanization, and included a marine protected area. Debris was observed and sediments were collected for MPs extraction via fluidization/floatation methodology. The order of MP abundance (par/kg) generally reflected the level of anthropogenic activity: Bostanu (1258 ± 291) > Gorsozan (122 ± 23) > Khor-e-Yekshabeh (26 ± 6) > Suru (14 ± 4) > Khor-e-Azini (2 ± 1). Across all sites fibers dominated (83%, 11% film, 6% fragments). FT-IR analysis showed polyethylene (PE), nylon, and PET (polyethylene terephthalate) were the commonly recovered polymers. Likely sources include beach debris, discarded fishing gear, and urban and industrial outflows that contain fibers from clothes. This study provides a ‘snapshot’ of MP pollution and longitudinal studies are required to fully understand plastic contamination in the region.

Plug the marine litter tap: a pilot study on potential marine litter sources in urban areas

Blidberg E, Leander E. Plug the marine litter tap: a pilot study on potential marine litter sources in urban areas. 501st ed. Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers; 2017 p. 65. Available from: https://books.google.com/books?id=SMpVDgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Book

Marine litter is a growing environmental problem, especially plastic material is accumulated in the seas where it will fragment to smaller pieces. Marine litter has severe consequences for the marine life, as well as for economy and social development. Marine litter is high on the political agenda, and legislations, amongst all the Marine Strategy Framework Directive's descriptor 10 for determining good environmental status, aims at preventing waste to become marine litter. The purpose of the pilot study presented in this report is to raise awareness amongst officials at municipalities and authorities about the need to reduce the presence of litter in the marine environment and to give ideas/suggestions on how this can be done. The project has therefore developed a “Plug the Marine Litter Tap”-approach, which together with local knowledge and experience, can be used to identify sources of marine debris by using existing statistics. Södertälje is used as a pilot area where we give examples on indicators for marine litter in the urban environment and proposed measures for each indicator. We hope that this will encourage municipalities to reflect on how preventive measures against marine litter can be incorporated in local waste management plans and become part of their regular routine.

A rapid-screening approach to detect and quantify microplastics based on fluorescent tagging with Nile Red

Maes T, Jessop R, Wellner N, Haupt K, Mayes AG. A rapid-screening approach to detect and quantify microplastics based on fluorescent tagging with Nile Red. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7:44501. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315110256_A_rapid-screening_approach_to_detect_and_quantify_microplastics_based_on_fluorescent_tagging_with_Nile_Red
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

A new approach is presented for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples, based on selective fluorescent staining using Nile Red (NR), followed by density-based extraction and filtration. The dye adsorbs onto plastic surfaces and renders them fluorescent when irradiated with blue light. Fluorescence emission is detected using simple photography through an orange filter. Image-analysis allows fluorescent particles to be identified and counted. Magnified images can be recorded and tiled to cover the whole filter area, allowing particles down to a few micrometres to be detected. The solvatochromic nature of Nile Red also offers the possibility of plastic categorisation based on surface polarity characteristics of identified particles. This article details the development of this staining method and its initial cross-validation by comparison with infrared (IR) microscopy. Microplastics of different sizes could be detected and counted in marine sediment samples. The fluorescence staining identified the same particles as those found by scanning a filter area with IR-microscopy.

Differentiating littering, urban runoff and marine transport as sources of marine debris in coastal and estuarine environments

Willis K, Hardesty BDenise, Kriwoken L, Wilcox C. Differentiating littering, urban runoff and marine transport as sources of marine debris in coastal and estuarine environments. Scientific Reports [Internet]. 2017 ;7:44479. Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/srep44479
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Marine debris is a burgeoning global issue with economic, ecological and aesthetic impacts. While there are many studies now addressing this topic, the influence of urbanisation factors such as local population density, stormwater drains and roads on the distribution of coastal litter remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we carried out standardized surveys at 224 transect surveys at 67 sites in two estuaries and along the open coast in Tasmania, Australia. We explored the relative support for three hypotheses regarding the sources of the debris; direct deposition by beachgoers, transport from surrounding areas via storm water drains and coastal runoff, and onshore transport from the marine system. We found strong support for all three mechanisms, however, onshore transport from the marine reservoir was the most important mechanism. Overall, the three models together explained 45.8 percent of the variation in our observations. Our results also suggest that most debris released into the marine environment is deposited locally, which may be the answer to where all the missing plastic is in the ocean. Furthermore, local interventions are likely to be most effective in reducing land-based inputs into the ocean.

Microplastics and mesoplastics in fish from coastal and fresh waters of China

Jabeen K, Su L, Li J, Yang D, Tong C, Mu J, Shi H. Microplastics and mesoplastics in fish from coastal and fresh waters of China. Environmental Pollution [Internet]. 2017 ;221:141 - 149. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749116311666
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

Plastic pollution is a growing global concern. In the present study, we investigated plastic pollution in 21 species of sea fish and 6 species of freshwater fish from China. All of the species were found to ingest micro- or mesoplastics. The average abundance of microplastics varied from 1.1 to 7.2 items by individual and 0.2–17.2 items by gram. The average abundance of mesoplastics varied from 0.2 to 3.0 items by individual and 0.1–3.9 items by gram. Microplastics were abundant in 26 species, accounting for 55.9–92.3% of the total number of plastics items in each species. Thamnaconus septentrionalis contained the highest abundance of microplastics (7.2 items/individual). The average abundance of plastics in sea benthopelagic fishes was significantly higher than in freshwater benthopelagic fishes by items/individual. The plastics were dominanted by fiber in shape, transparent in color and cellophane in composition. The proportion of plastics in the stomach to the intestines showed great variation in different species, ranging from 0.5 to 1.9 by items/individual. The stomach of Harpodon nehereus and intestines of Pampus cinereus contained the highest number of plastics, (3.3) and (2.7), respectively, by items/individual. Our results suggested that plastic pollution was widespread in the investigated fish species and showed higher abundance in comparison with worldwide studies. The ingestion of plastics in fish was closely related to the habitat and gastrointestinal tract structure. We highly recommend that the entire gastrointestinal tract and digestion process be used in future investigations of plastic pollution in fish.

Floating macro-litter along the Mediterranean French coast: Composition, density, distribution and overlap with cetacean range

Di-Méglio N, Campana I. Floating macro-litter along the Mediterranean French coast: Composition, density, distribution and overlap with cetacean range. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17301418
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

This study investigated the composition, density and distribution of floating macro-litter along the Liguro-Provençal basin with respect to cetaceans presence. Survey transects were performed in summer between 2006 and 2015 from sailing vessels with simultaneous cetaceans observations. During 5171 km travelled, 1993 floating items were recorded, widespread in the whole study area. Plastics was the predominant category, with bags/packaging always representing > 45% of total items. Overall mean density (14.98 items/km2) was stable with significant increase reported only in 2010–2011; monthly analysis showed lower litter densities in July–September, suggesting possible seasonal patterns. Kernel density estimation for plastics revealed ubiquitous distribution rather than high accumulation areas, mainly due to the circulation dynamics of this area. The presence range of cetaceans (259 sightings, 6 species) corresponded by ~ 50% with plastic distribution, indicating high potential of interaction, especially in the eastern part of the area, but effective risks for marine species might be underrepresented.

Sea of Opportunity: Supply Chain Investment Opportunities to Address Marine Plastic Pollution

Moss E, Eidson A, Jambeck J. Sea of Opportunity: Supply Chain Investment Opportunities to Address Marine Plastic Pollution. Seattle, WA: Vulcan; 2017. Available from: http://plasticreport.vulcan.com
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Report

Plastics pollution can be curtailed by targeting the source of the issue. This report uniquely looks all the way upstream, and down to the point of plastic entering the ocean. It identifies solutions throughout the supply chain and provides a full portfolio of intervention options and investment and philanthropic opportunities.

Marine debris in five national parks in Alaska

Polasek L, Bering J, Kim H, Neitlich P, Pister B, Terwilliger M, Nicolato K, Turner C, Jones T. Marine debris in five national parks in Alaska. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17301133
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $39.95
Type: Journal Article

Marine debris is a management issue with ecological and recreational impacts for agencies, especially on remote beaches not accessible by road. This project was implemented to remove and document marine debris from five coastal National Park Service units in Alaska. Approximately 80 km of coastline were cleaned with over 10,000 kg of debris collected. Marine debris was found at all 28 beaches surveyed. Hard plastics were found on every beach and foam was found at every beach except one. Rope/netting was the next most commonly found category, present at 23 beaches. Overall, plastic contributed to 60% of the total weight of debris. Rope/netting (14.6%) was a greater proportion of the weight from all beaches than foam (13.3%). Non-ferrous metal contributed the smallest amount of debris by weight (1.7%). The work forms a reference condition dataset of debris surveyed in the Western Arctic and the Gulf of Alaska within one season.

The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry: Nature of Plastic Marine Pollution in the Subtropical Gyres

Eriksen M, Thiel M, Lebreton L. The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry: Nature of Plastic Marine Pollution in the Subtropical Gyres. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg; 2017 p. 28. Available from: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/698_2016_123
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $29.95
Type: Book

The abundance and distribution of plastic debris in the marine environment show patterns of near- and offshore generation, migration toward and accumulation in the subtropical gyres, fragmentation, and redistribution globally. Ecological impacts in the subtropical gyres include invasive species transport and rampant ingestion and entanglement; yet plastics have also created substantial new habitat, resulting in population increases in some species. Though estimates of surface abundance and weight indicate over a quarter million tons and particle counts in the trillions, there is also a rapid removal of microplastics from the sea surface. Recent studies show widespread occurrence of these microplastics throughout the vertical column and in benthic and coastal sediments. It is likely that sedimentation is the ultimate fate for plastic lost at sea. Before microplastics sink, they likely cause significant impacts to marine food chains and ecosystems. In the open ocean, plastics are mingled with marine communities, making removal at sea prohibitive. This new understanding informs mitigation efforts to divert attention away from open-ocean cleanup. Similar to the way societies dealt with widely distributed particulate contamination in the air above cities, the “smog” of microplastics destined to pass through marine ecosystems before finally settling on the seafloor is best addressed with preventative measures.

Plastic litter in sediments from a marine area likely to become protected (Aeolian Archipelago's islands, Tyrrhenian sea)

Fastelli P, Blašković A, Bernardi G, Romeo T, Čižmek H, Andaloro F, Russo GF, Guerranti C, Renzi M. Plastic litter in sediments from a marine area likely to become protected (Aeolian Archipelago's islands, Tyrrhenian sea). Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2016 ;113(1-2):526 - 529. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16306828
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $35.95
Type: Journal Article

This research aims to define for the first time levels and patterns of different litter groups (macro, meso and microplastics) in sediments from a marine area designed for the institution of a new marine protected area (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). Microplastics resulted the principal group and found in all samples analyzed, with shape and colours variable between different sampling sites. MPs levels measured in this study are similar to values recorded in harbour sites and lower than reported in Adriatic Sea, while macroplastics levels are notably lower than in harbor sites. Sediment grain-size and island extent resulted not significant in determining levels and distribution of plastic debris among islands. In the future, following the establishment of the MPA in the study area, these basic data will be useful to check for potential protective effects on the levels and distribution of plastic debris.

A risk framework for tackling marine debris

Hardesty BD, Wilcox C. A risk framework for tackling marine debris. [Internet]. 2017 . Available from: http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2017/AY/C6AY02934E#!divAbstract
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Approximate cost to purchase or rent this item from the publisher: 
US $52.91
Type: Journal Article

Understanding plastic pollution from a systems perspective requires a way of conceptualizing sources, distribution and dynamics in the environment; identifying or quantifying impacts on wildlife, humans and other assets; and identifying and evaluating potential management responses. The uncertainties in our knowledge and the difficulty in resolving them satisfactorily can be challenging, given that we are confined to working with largely observational data because experiments at scale are difficult or impossible. To advance this area of research, we suggest applying a conceptual framework that allows us to break the components into smaller parts that can integrate uncertainty and connect variables of interest to outcomes of interest. We identify four specific questions inherent to a risk framework: the first three focus on risk analysis, and the fourth on risk management or mitigation. We present examples that are both data rich and data poor and discuss the value of integrating a systems perspective, connecting sources and drivers to dynamics and distribution to impacts and management responses. We also propose applying risk analysis to the plastics pollution issue as we acknowledge and embrace uncertainty, noting the precautionary principle and its application to risk management.

Sources, Fate and Effects of Microplastics in the Marine Environment: Part 2 of a Global Assessment

Kershaw PJ, Rochman CM eds. Sources, Fate and Effects of Microplastics in the Marine Environment: Part 2 of a Global Assessment. London, UK: International Maritime Organization; 2016 p. 220 pp.
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Report

This report provides an update and further assessment of the sources, fate and effects of microplastics in the marine environment, carried out by Working Group 40 (WG40) of GESAMP (The Joint Group of Experts on Scientific Aspects of Marine Protection). It follows publication of the first assessment report in this series in April 2015 (GESAMP 2015). The issue of marine plastic litter was raised during the inaugural meeting of the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) in June 2014. Delegates from 160 countries adopted Resolution 1/6 on ‘Marine plastic debris and microplastics’ (Annex I). The resolution welcomed the work being undertaken by GESAMP on microplastics and requested the Executive Director of UNEP to carry out a study on marine plastics and microplastics. This was to be based on a combination of existing and new studies, including WG40. This provided the motivation for GESAMP to revise the original terms of reference to reflect both the request from UNEP to contribute to the UNEA study, and the key recommendations from the WG40 2015 report. 

Magnitudes, sources, and management of beach litter along the Atlantico department coastline, Caribbean coast of Colombia

Rangel-Buitrago N, Williams A, Anfuso G, Arias M, C. AGracia. Magnitudes, sources, and management of beach litter along the Atlantico department coastline, Caribbean coast of Colombia. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2017 ;138:142 - 157. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116302873
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Twenty-six beaches belonging to Atlántico department, Caribbean coast of Colombia, were surveyed to determine magnitudes, sources, and management of litter. Beach litter was observed along the entire coastline, and a total of 7,597 items weighing 412 kg were collected from all 26 beaches surveyed. The average abundance of litter found along the study area was 2.9 items m−1. Vegetation debris and plastic items dominated the samples respectively with 59% (Avg: 1.72 items m−1) and 27% (Avg: 0.82 items m−1). Other litter groups were polystyrene 3% (Avg: 0.1 items m−1), rubber 3% (Avg: 0.08 items m−1) and glass 2% (Avg: 0.04 items m−1). Metal, organic, processed wood, paper and biohazards items reached 5%, while textiles and miscellaneous represented less than 1%. Concerning buoyancy characteristics, the most represented litter category was persistent buoyant litter (with 91% of items), followed by short-term (6%) and non-buoyant litter (3%). The primary source of litter corresponds to litter transported by rivers, mainly the Magdalena River, together with human activities related to beach use (i.e.tourism). Litter produced poor scenic scores along the Atlántico department coastline and improvement can easily upgrade scenic beach quality scores. Results such as those given are necessary to identify, improve and conserve beaches standards together with the contribution that they make to the environmental, social and economic, well-being of local communities. Beach litter management along the study area (as well along the Caribbean coast of Colombia) must be based on strategies to reduce or eliminate litter sources. For that, it is necessary to consider beach types to define the intensity and periodicity of actions to be implemented.

Leachate from microplastics impairs larval development in brown mussels

Silva PPena Ganda, Nobre CRodrigues, Resaffe P, Pereira CDias Seabr, Gusmão F. Leachate from microplastics impairs larval development in brown mussels. Water Research [Internet]. 2016 ;106:364 - 370. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135416307667
Freely available?: 
Yes
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

Microplastic debris is a pervasive type of contaminant in marine ecosystems, being considered a major threat to marine biota. One of the problems of microplastics is that they can adsorb contaminants in extremely high concentrations. When released from the particle, these contaminants have the potential to cause toxic effects in the biota. So far, reports of toxic effects are mostly linked with the direct exposure of organisms through ingestion of contaminated microplastics. There is little information on the toxicity of leachates from microplastics to marine organisms. In this study, we conducted experiments to evaluate the toxicity of leachates from virgin and beached plastic pellets to embryo development of the brown mussel (Perna perna). We compared the efficiency of two test procedures, and evaluated the toxicity of beached pellets collected in a coastal marine protected area. We observed that mussel embryo is sensitive to leachate from both virgin and beached pellets. However, the toxicity of the leachate from beached pellets was much higher than that of virgin pellets. We suggest contaminants adsorbed onto the surface of beached pellets were responsible for the high toxicity of leachate from beached pellets, while the toxicity of leachate from virgin pellets was mainly due to plastic additives. Our results suggest microplastic debris may be harmful even if ingestion is not the only or main pathway of interaction of marine organisms with contaminated plastic debris.

Floating plastic debris in the Central and Western Mediterranean Sea

Ruiz-Orejón LF, Sardà R, Ramis-Pujol J. Floating plastic debris in the Central and Western Mediterranean Sea. Marine Environmental Research [Internet]. 2016 ;120:136 - 144. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0141113616301325
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

In two sea voyages throughout the Mediterranean (2011 and 2013) that repeated the historical travels of Archduke Ludwig Salvator of Austria (1847–1915), 71 samples of floating plastic debris were obtained with a Manta trawl. Floating plastic was observed in all the sampled sites, with an average weight concentration of 579.3 g dw km−2(maximum value of 9298.2 g dw km−2) and an average particle concentration of 147,500 items km−2 (the maximum concentration was 1,164,403 items km−2). The plastic size distribution showed microplastics (<5 mm) in all the samples. The most abundant particles had a surface area of approximately 1 mm2 (the mesh size was 333 μm). The general estimate obtained was a total value of 1455 tons dw of floating plastic in the entire Mediterranean region, with various potential spatial accumulation areas.

The role of public participation GIS (PPGIS) and fishermen's perceptions of risk in marine debris mitigation in the Bay of Fundy, Canada

Barnett AJ, Wiber MG, Rooney MP, Maillet DGCurtis. The role of public participation GIS (PPGIS) and fishermen's perceptions of risk in marine debris mitigation in the Bay of Fundy, Canada. Ocean & Coastal Management [Internet]. 2016 ;133:85 - 94. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569116301892
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
No
Type: Journal Article

From nano-plastics to large sunken vessels, marine debris presents a threat to humans and ecosystems worldwide. Fishermen's knowledge of the sources of, and risks posed by medium to large debris derived from fishing, aquaculture, and other marine industries provides important context for debris mitigation. Public participation geographic information systems (PPGIS) can address these risks by integrating subjective and objective spatial data on human and environmental impacts and risks. We integrated fishermen's perceptions and experiences with marine debris with spatial data using PPGIS. We developed a georeferenced database of fishermen's experiences with marine debris, collected during focus groups and at various other meetings in Southwest New Brunswick. This layer was used to integrate baseline data with subjective perceptions of the ecological, economic, and navigational risks associated with marine debris in the Bay of Fundy, Canada. We also documented the physical, technical, political, and regulatory challenges to marine debris mitigation. These challenges highlight the social and environmental processes that complicate any projects that attempt to develop uncontested spatial representations of marine debris. Finally, we discuss the potential of PPGIS to address these challenges by fostering communication, coordinating various marine activities, helping stakeholders set priorities for clean-up, and implementing collaborative clean-up projects.

Fisheries as a source of marine debris on beaches in the United Kingdom

Unger A, Harrison N. Fisheries as a source of marine debris on beaches in the United Kingdom. Marine Pollution Bulletin [Internet]. 2016 ;107(1):52 - 58. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X16302077
Freely available?: 
No
Summary available?: 
Yes
Type: Journal Article

Marine debris from ships has persisted and remains a concern despite international agreements such as MARPOL. We report on an analysis of beach litter based on a data set established by the Marine Conservation Society (MSC) Beachwatch weekends. Debris collected around the UK was divided into three main types of debris: (1) plastic, (2) fishing, and (3) fishing related plastic and rubber. Correspondence analysis (CA) was used to examine patterns in the occurrence of debris types on a total of 1023 beaches and debris attributable to fishing was identified on clusters of beaches mainly located on the coasts of Scotland and along the English Channel. General Linear model (GLM) identified fishing as the highest explanatory factor when testing for relationships between litter and proximity to fishing ports and grounds. The results add to the growing body of evidence that the fishing industry is largely responsible for marine debris.

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